Update November 2013

 

Hello Friends,

The rains have returned to Zambia, and everything is becoming lush and green.  It is amazing how quickly the landscape changes.  Farmers are busy planting their crops for the growing season, and at Flying Mission Zambia we have also had a busy couple of months.  In addition to the normal flying, we have been able to help the Zambian Wildlife Authority (ZAWA) with an aerial survey of the large mammals in their national parks.  Flying Mission and a couple of other companies here in Zambia were selected to help with this important job.  The aerial survey helps ZAWA track how healthy different mammal species are and if the populations are rising or declining.  It is also good for Flying Mission because it helps us make connections with individuals and the Zambian Government.  I was able to help with this survey and spent 90+ hours in one of our airplanes bouncing around at 350 FT above the ground while the spotters counted animals.  We took off shortly after sunrise, took a break mid morning, and then flew till sunset; I saw a lot of very beautiful sunrises and sunsets during this time, and it gave me the opportunity to get to know some great people.  I also enjoyed spending some time in the amazing Zambian National Parks!!  For some pictures and a short writeup I did on this project check out my post HERE.

Thank you so much to those who helped out with my truck fund.  While I still have not been able to sell it, I think I have at least come to a temporary resolution.  After my last update, I got my truck back from the mechanic that has been working on it and he was able to sort a couple of issues, and told me that they were responsible for the “consistently inconsistent” engine problems.  However, the problems came back almost immediately and I began to look into the wiring and was able to find a loose connector.  I secured it and the problems have not returned.  So I am hopeful that at least this problem has been solved.  This gives me a bit of breathing room, I am still trying to sell the truck, but I can wait for a better buyer at a better price now, and I am thankful for that.  Please continue to be in prayer about this!
Otherwise, I have settled into a bit of a routine here in Lusaka, our flying schedule will slow down in December and January and it will give us the opportunity to catch up on other projects the mission is working on.  I have been studying for the Aircraft Maintenance Engineering test, and will shortly be writing the exam.  If I pass I will be able to do more on the aircraft maintenance side.  It is going to be strange to experience a hot, rainy, and humid Christmas, but I am blessed to have a close friend coming to visit, so I am looking forward to it.  I want to wish everyone a very Happy Thanksgiving and a Merry Christmas!

SME (Share my Experience)

In this episode of “share my experience” I want to tell you a little about the church that I have been attending here in Lusaka.  Living near the capital city in a developing country presents the expatriate with extra options and opportunities when it comes to choosing a church.  We have “village” churches in the neighborhood surrounding our base, as well as churches that are predominately full of white expatriates in the city.  While the village churches are great because they are full of Zambian culture, often most of their services are in one of the local languages, and until I learn more of the languages I wouldn’t really be able to participate.  The expatriate churches are also great because they are more like what I am used to, and are in English and feel more like home, but they lack Zambian flare and culture.  In my beginning stages here I was hoping for something with a mix of both, and for the time being I think I have found it.  I have been attending a large church in Lusaka called Miracle Life Family Church.  The preaching is in English with an American pastor, but is a 90% Zambian congregation.  The worship is led by a Zambian worship band and they rock!!  But the words are on a screen so when they sing songs in the local languages, I can read and understand what they are saying.  Many of the members of the congregation are middle to upper class Zambians, these are the people that can truly influence the future of Zambia in a positive way, and I am enjoying getting to know some of them.  Not sure if I will attend this church for a short time, or long term, but so far I have been blessed by it.

Well that’s all for now! If you have any questions or comments please email me, I’ll be happy to answer them and give you even more information on what life is like here in Zambia!

 God’s Blessings on you all,

Jonathan

 

Praises For:

  • Safety with all of the wildlife flying.
  • Figuring out some of the problems with the truck.
  • The Lord is blessing me with a good attitude through all the changes and challenges.

Prayers for:

  •  My Aircraft Maintenance Engineering Test.
  • Continued good adjustment and focus on God.
  • Safe Flying through the rainy season!
  • For the ministries we support to be blessed by God in the work they are doing for him.
  • The ring beam has been set, just a few more layers of blocks and the church will be ready for the roof!

    The ring beam has been set, just a few more layers of blocks and the church will be ready for the roof!

Update September 2013!

Greetings from Zambia!

The warmth has returned, but it’s still dry and dusty here.  It hasn’t rained in 5 months but within the next 2 months the rains should return.  Since my last update there have been many things that have changed!  I have moved into a house that is going to be my permanent home here, its a nice little 2 bedroom house in the community very near our base (see pictures in my pictures post).  I also have gotten a roommate, his name is Alex and he is from Canada working with Flying Mission as an auto mechanic for 1 year.  It has been nice to have some company as well as cut down on the cost of rent.  Also the shipping container with my tools and a few other personal items arrived, it’s been nice to use my own tools to work on airplanes!  Finally, I have had the privilege flying a few longer trips with regional directors to some of the different locations they have ministries in Zambia.  I really enjoyed meeting the different missionaries and seeing the work they are doing in rural Zambia!  God’s work is alive and well here!  if you want to hear more about these ministries or the different kinds of work we support here in Zambia, email me, I ‘d love to share in more detail!

One thing that hasn’t changed yet is my problematic truck.  It has continued to cause problems, and I haven’t been able to sell it.  I was able to buy a dirt bike, and it has been great for getting me to the base everyday, but it’s not licensed yet and can’t be my only transportation once the rains start.  I am in the process of seeing what my best options are right now for getting some other reliable transportation, but it looks like I am going to need to raise a few thousand dollars in order to get a different vehicle that will work in this challenging driving environment.  PLEASE be in prayer about this situation and if you are able to contribute a bit extra towards getting my transportation needs resolved that would be great!  You can print a form HERE and send it to the address at the top with donations.  If you want more information on my transportation needs please let me know!

SME (Share my Experience)

On to more enjoyable topics!!  The church in Mwembeshi village is starting to take shape!  The walls are now in process, and as they raise more money they are continuing to build.  The congregation was able to raise enough money for 500 more blocks and I was able to match them with money I had set aside for the church.  Lord willing we can continue with the matching funds until the walls are completed!  I am hoping to visit soon to see the latest progress.

I have also been able to get involved in the football (soccer) ministry at Flying Mission.  I’ve only just begun getting to know the different boys that come out and play, but it’s obvious to see they are way better at playing then I am!  On Saturday mornings about 10 or so of the boys come to a Bible study that I have also had the privilege of getting involved in.  I’m hoping to be able to build some good relationships, and encourage these young men as they mature!

Well that’s all for now, Thank you for being involved and interested in my life!  If you have any questions or comments please email me, I’ll be happy to answer them and give you even more information on what life is like here in Zambia!

May the Lord bless you and keep you,

Jonathan

Pictures are worth a 1000 words.

My house!!

My house!!

Just before I had to start bailing water out of the boat so we could stay afloat!!

Just before I had to start bailing water out of the boat so we could stay afloat!!

Local on the Zambezi!

Local on the Zambezi!

Sunset on the Zambezi River!

Sunset on the Zambezi River!

Up close and personal!

Up close and personal!

Lovely view before sunset.

Lovely view before sunset.

The beautiful "common bee eater"

The beautiful “common bee eater”

My (semi) sea worthy vessel on Lake Tanganyika.

My (semi) sea worthy vessel on Lake Tanganyika.

Hungry hungry hippos...

Hungry hungry hippos…

Almost looks like paradise!

Almost looks like paradise!

Zimbabwe off in the distance.  Can you see the bungee jumper?

Zimbabwe off in the distance. Can you see the bungee jumper?

Avionics upgrade on one of our airplanes!  It's gonna be nice.

Avionics upgrade on one of our airplanes! It’s gonna be nice.

The walls are going up at the Church!

The walls are going up at the Church!

My tools finally arrived!!!!  Yay!!

My tools finally arrived!!!! Yay!!

My cousins the Weaver birds!

My cousins the Weaver birds!

We got a nice welcome from the choir at the local baptist church when we arrived in Solwezi.

We got a nice welcome from the choir at the local baptist church when we arrived in Solwezi.

Fresh Fish!!

Fresh Fish!!

My little Gecko friend.

My little Gecko friend.

Mongu Harbor, anyone want some fresh fish??

Mongu Harbor, anyone want some fresh fish??

I learned a ton in my cultural orientation class!

I learned a ton in my cultural orientation class!

My living room!

My living room!

Driving in Lusaka is always exciting.  Driving in Lusaka is always exciting.

I often get stuck in heavy traffic.

I often get stuck in heavy traffic.

Swimming hole just off the Zambezi River.  No Crocodiles because it has rapids on both sides.

Swimming hole just off the Zambezi River. No Crocodiles because it has rapids on both sides.

Winter in Africa

Hello Friends and greetings from

chilly Zambia!

“Winter” has taken over in Zambia, and while it’s nothing near what I am used to from Ohio, it’s interesting to live in a house with no central heating or insulation.  When the temperature outside dips into the 40’s at night, the temperature inside quickly follows, and it makes for some chilly evenings and mornings!  However, the sun comes out almost everyday and warms things back up, so that is a nice difference from winter in Ohio!  Since my last letter I have gotten my official Zambian Commercial Pilot’s License and have been able to see much of the country from the air, including Victoria Falls which is included in the pictures!  It has been very fulfilling and gratifying to finally be doing what I felt called to so long ago, and I praise the Lord for sustaining and leading me to this point!

There have also been some challenges that have come along as well, and the greatest so far has been my need for reliable ground transportation.  The truck that I bought has continued cause problems and it even seems that whomever sent this truck to Africa intentionally made it to look good on the surface, but to be made up of worn out and bad parts underneath.  It’s also frustrating because I went through what seemed to be reputable sources to obtain it but still ended up in this spot, and while I have attempted to deal with the company, they have been unwilling to help.   It’s interesting really, and I think it illustrates one of the problems that Africa as a whole is facing.  Those that have interest in Africa for non “mission” reasons seem to mostly see it as a place to be used for their own personal gain.  Things that are substandard for “western” countries are sent to Africa where they are accepted because it’s the best they can get.  Certainly much of the aid is good and helpful, but it seems like the more Africa can stand on it’s own, the better off it will be (but I’ve only been here 5 months, so we’ll see what I think after a few years 🙂 ).  All that to say, I’ve decided to try to sell this truck to someone who might be better equipped deal with it, but because I’m going to be honest about the problems that it has, I probably won’t be able to get get back out of it what I have invested in.

SME (Share my Experience)

On to more enjoyable topics… Last time I left you wondering if I was “fit” enough to drive.  The good news is now that we knew what hours the hospital was open for examinations, we went back right at the opening time and 3 of us got exams passed in less than 30 mins!!  So I guess it’s really all about having the right information to do what needs to be done.  I’ll spare you the rest of the details on transferring my US driving license to a Zambian one, but three more trips to RTSA buildings and a 60 days of waiting for them to print and laminate my card (and you thought 45 mins at the BMV was bad…) and I have a official Zambian driving license!
This month though I want to share a little bit more about my “African Family” and the work that they are doing on building their church.  When I stayed with them, it was obvious that their current church building was too small for the congregation and not a good space at all.  I had been given some extra money from a few of you to use to bless some African’s however I felt led.  The church wanted so badly to begin building, but the concrete slab is the most expensive part and they didn’t have enough to lay it first.  They were considering building the walls and leaving the floor dirt, but I didn’t want them to have a church with a dirt floor!!  So I was able to step in and help!  With the money donated plus a little extra I had we were able to come up with enough to lay the slab!  The church is excited to have a floor and the walls will soon be going up.  They have enough blocks for the walls to go up about half way, and will continue to raise money until it’s all done!  It’s been a blessing to me to be used by the Lord to bless them with the floor they may never have had for their church!

If you have any questions or comments please email me, I’ll be happy to answer them and give you even more information on what life is like here in Zambia!

God’s Blessings on you all,

Jonathan

Want to see more pictures?  Check out my facebook page HERE (you don’t need to be a member to see the pictures).

The church foundation, waiting for the slab!

The church foundation, waiting for the slab!

The new concrete slab for the church!

The new concrete slab for the church!

Victoria Falls from the Air!!

Victoria Falls from the Air!!

“God’s Will”

Life in Africa, always has something new for me right now.  Transitions are usually difficult, but keeping a good attitude and your sense of humor seem to be the keys to good transitions.  Driving in Lusaka, the capital city of Zambia, is quite the experience and I am still adjusting to it.  It’s hard enough to remember which side of the car to get into, and then which side of the road to drive on, but add to that a crazy mix of slow trucks, more speed bumps then I can count, cautious and slow drivers, and finally extremely aggressive fast “minibus” drivers, and it makes for exciting stories on every commute.  The beauty of the minibuses is that in spite of how they actually drive, they have friendly reminders of the important things of life posted all over them.  It’s good really, but it just doesn’t always seem like it after they have just cut you off, or held up 2 lanes of traffic with a green light because they pulled into an intersection that was already full when they had a red light.  But hey, it’s a whole lot easier to take pictures while sitting in traffic then driving right?  And after all we do want God’s will to be done…

"God's Will"

“God’s Will”

Life in Africa

Hello Friends and greetings from South Central Africa!

It has only been a little over a month since my last update, but it feels like several months of things have happened!  Since then, I have moved into the flight portion of my orientation.  I began by studying for and taking the two Zambian Air Law exams which by God’s grace I was able to pass both of them on the first try, then I read the Flying Mission standard operating procedures and started flying with the Chief Pilot and another mentor pilot.  We also had an airplane that needed to be taken to South Africa, to be painted and have the interior redone, so I was able to go along and see what international flying in Africa entails.  We spent 2 days in Johannesburg with a board member from Flying Mission, and then another 2 days in Gaborone, Botswana where we were able to tour Flying Mission Services and meet many of the people involved in the other branch of Flying Mission.  It was great to see a bit more of Africa, and to see the full picture of what makes up Flying Mission.  And then just this week, I was sent out on my own and began doing the normal mission flying!  I was also able to buy a truck that had been imported to South Africa, it seemed like a good vehicle to purchase, but unfortunately when it arrived in Zambia I found it had some problems that I was not told about.  So I am working through the best options for making it a reliable truck for me to use.

SME
In aviation we have something called an “SYE” form or Share Your Experience, when something interesting, abnormal, or possibly dangerous happens, a pilot or mechanic will fill out the form to share their experience in the hopes that others can learn from it.  I want to share with you some of the different experiences that I am having here in Africa, so this will be the SME section (share my experience). 🙂 Maybe there is something to learn from it, or maybe it’ll just make you giggle, but either way it will give you a bit of insight into what life is like here in Zambia.  Living in Africa is certainly a different experience than what we normally experience in “Western” countries.  Both have their advantages and disadvantages, where I am in Zambia, just outside the capital city of Lusaka is at times an odd mix of the two.  I went to get my Zambian Driving License not long after I arrived.  Having been given most of day to accomplish this task, combined with the fact that it would just be a transfer of my Ohio license, I was thinking that it couldn’t possibly take more than a day.  Well the first step for the license here in Zambia is to have a medical examination done to assure you are fit to drive.  Flying Mission had the forms at the base and I filled in my information on the form and set out with Paul, one of the team members who had most recently gotten a Zambian License.  We stopped at the nearest clinic and after a brief wait were told that we couldn’t do it there as there was no doctor on duty.  On to the next clinic, and after a bit of confusion as to where to enquire about the examinations we were told that they no longer did the driving license exam.  From there we moved onto a clinic that was a bit further away, and arrived just after 12pm when we found the receptions area, we were told that it was lunch time and we would have to wait until 2pm when they reopened.  Well, given that bad news we decided to have lunch ourselves and because there were other clinics in town we kept heading that way.  After lunch we headed to the next closest clinic, and again after some confusion as to where to go, a “helpful” employee took me aside and said that he would have the doctor sign the paper for me, but that I shouldn’t have written my name and address on it because it should all be done in the same handwriting.  I was a bit confused, and when it became apparent that I wouldn’t actually see the doctor but he wanted me to pay him right then and there, I hesitated and said that we would have to go get a new form because I had written on it.  Obviously seemed like something fishy was going on.  So we went on to the Road Transport and Safety Administration building (RTSA) and picked up a fresh medical exam form and decided to head to one of the hospitals in the hopes that we would have better success there.  We arrived and were told that indeed the exams were done there and were directed to the wing where they were done.  Upon arrival there was a sign that clearly stated that we were in the right spot for driving medical examinations!  Finally!  But the sign also clearly stated that they did them everyday from 8am until 2pm… by that point it was about 3:30pm and I enquired anyway just to be told to come back the next day at 8am.  In one last attempt to get it done, we went back to the clinic where they had told me I needed to have the blank form.  It was less busy by this time and we were able to ask a nurse about the exam.  She told us that the clinic was no longer able to do the exams because there had been people filling out the forms but not examining the patients.  (exactly what had almost happened to me, and apparently also the reason why clinic #2 couldn’t do the exams anymore either).  It was almost 5pm by that time and Paul and I were beat…after visiting 4 clinics, 1 hospital, and the RTSA building I had not yet gotten step one of the driving license accomplished, what a day!  While I am enjoying living in Africa, and Zambians are wonderful and hospitable people, there are times when being in a new place brings many challenges… oh and teaches you a little patience. 🙂  Well friends, I fear I have written too much so you’ll just have to stay tuned next month to find out if I am physically fit enough to drive or not (sure hope so as I’m flying airplanes all around)…  God’s Blessings on you all.
Jonathan

Praises For:

  • Passing my Zambian Air Law exams.
  • The beginning of my flying is going well.
  • The Lord is blessing me with a good attitude through all the changes and challenges.

Prayers for:

  • The decisions I need to make on fixing the truck I bought.
  • Continued good adjustment and focus on God.
  • Safe Flying!
  • For the ministries we support to be blessed by God in the work they are doing for him.
South Africa!

South Africa!

Just no escaping them.

Just no escaping them.

Doesn't taste like chicken... surprisingly its more like beef

Doesn’t taste like chicken… surprisingly its more like beef

Granadilla (passion fruit) fields in South Africa.

Granadilla (passion fruit) fields in South Africa.

I get to see many African sunrises with many early morning flights!

I get to see many African sunrises with many early morning flights!

Settling in Lusaka

Mwembeshi

Greetings from Zambia!

After an enjoyable two weeks living in a Zambian Village, I am settling into living in Lusaka, Zambia.

My village time was truly a blessing.  James and Elosia Shampande took me in for two weeks and allowed me to live with them and 5 of their kids on their farm in Mwembeshi, Zambia.  The Shampande’s have 7 kids total, but two are grown and married and live in the city.  James is a pastor at a local church in the village, but also farms his land with the help of his family.  They were very open and hospitable, and allowed me to see what life is like, and to ask any questions that I wanted.  I learned many things about Zambian culture, Nyanja (one of the many Zambian languages), and even a few things about farming.  🙂  Among other things I harvested beans, helped plow a field, and climbed inside a water tank to try to stop it from leaking!  We also visited other members of the church in the village, took a trip to a neighboring town called Mumbwa, went to James’s church, and visited a neighboring village church that he helped to plant.  I ate nshima (a cornmeal paste) and assorted side dishes with my hands, for almost every meal, and slept in a mud brick hut with a thatched roof.  My time in the village was very enjoyable, and the Shampande’s have told me that they will be my African family and I am welcome anytime!

A few interesting things about current village living… they have electricity, cell phones, a freezer, and even a TV!!  Life is certainly not plush or easy, but it is interesting to see how modern things are working their way even into the African bush.

I am scheduled to finish my cultural orientation this week, and begin my flight orientation next week.  I have learned much so far, but I know there are still many things to learn!  I am excited to start flying and seeing more of the Zambian countryside.  The rainy season is ending so it will be nice to see things before they turn brown during the dry season!

I am still looking for a quality vehicle at a reasonable price so that is a major prayer concern!!  I will be housesitting for another missionary who is on furlough for the next 2 1/2 months, and she is also letting my drive her car until I find my own, so that is a major blessing!

Thank you to all of those who have been praying and thinking about me!  I appreciate all of the comments and emails, even if I do not respond to them very quickly!  The internet here is very slow and expensive, but hey, at least I can connect and communicate!  I have uploaded some pictures to Facebook from my village stay and you can see them by clicking HERE.  Even if you do not have Facebook you can see the content on my page!

Praises For:

  • A safe, healthy, and enjoyable time in the Zambian Village!
  • Having a temporary house to live in and car to drive while I find my own.
  • The many new things I have learned thus far about Zambia and it’s people!
  • The many ways the Lord is blessing me in this transition.

Prayers For:

  • Finding a good vehicle at a reasonable price!! (Yes I’m still looking!)
  • Continued focus on God during the transition.
  • Safety as I begin flying, and wisdom as I begin writing my tests and transferring my licenses over to Zambia.

Send me Mail!!!!
Jonathan Weaver
Postnet #197, P/Bag E891
Lusaka, Zambia

Mud brick hut with a thatched roof!

Mud brick hut with a thatched roof!

My African Family!

My African Family!

Headed to the Village!

 

Hello Friends!

I have been in Zambia for a little over two weeks now, and I’m sure that many of you are wondering what I have been up to!  Well, just for a quick update, I have been getting to know Zambian culture, the city of Lusaka, and the Flying Mission team.  They have asked that I do not spend a lot of my time sending out prayer letters, and corresponding with people back home during this time of transition and orientation, but instead focus on learning about and adjusting to my new home!  So at the end of orientation (about 3 months) I will send out a more detailed description of all that has transpired.  But for now I do want to let you know that things are going well, and I am learning a lot!  Tomorrow, I will be leaving to live in a rural village for two weeks.  This will help me to understand and empathize with how most Zambians live.  I am looking forward to it!!  I have a Zambian host family, and I will just be living life with them for two weeks.  After that time, Lord willing, I will return to Lusaka (the capital city of Zambia) and continue with several more weeks of learning the culture, adapting to the differences, visiting places in the city, and getting details sorted out like finding a vehicle, obtaining a driving license, etc.  Then I will move into the flight orientation phase and transfer my flight licenses, and get adapted to flying here in Zambia with Flying Mission.

Praises For:

  • Safe travels through out my time traveling to Zambia!
  • A warm welcome from the Flying Mission family.
  • The many new things I have learned thus far about Zambia and it’s people!

Prayers For:

  • A healthy, beneficial time in the village.
  • Finding a good vehicle at a reasonable price.
  • Continued focus on God during the transition.

Send me Mail!!!!
Jonathan Weaver
Postnet #197, P/Bag E891
Lusaka, Zambia

Kaunda International Airport in Lusaka, Zambia.  It was nice to get off the airplane and be warm!

Kaunda International Airport in Lusaka, Zambia. It was nice to get off the airplane and be warm!

The planes I will be flying soon!!

The planes I will be flying soon!!

A view of a few of the buildings in Lusaka.

A view of a few of the buildings in Lusaka.

 

 

Update!! Feb 25th, 2013

Well, it’s has been a busy last couple of months for me as I have prepared to move to Africa.  I arrived home from North Carolina in mid December and was able to see many family members and friends during the Holiday season, as well as visit a few churches and continue to spread the word about the ministry that the Lord has called me to in Zambia!

From January 21st to February 8th I attended a course at Mission Training International (MTI) which was very beneficial.  Their organization exists to help missionaries and their families to make the jump from home culture into another culture and back successfully.  I was able to learn some practical skills and attitudes that will help me as I make that transition!  The time I spent there was much needed and truly Christ centered, and I appreciated it very much.

After I arrived home from MTI, I had one week to get everything else done before I got on a plane headed to Scotland on February 15th.   It was quite a world wind but everything got done, praise the Lord!  Thank you SO MUCH to everyone who helped with and came to my open house.  It was so nice to see as many people as I could and be able say goodbye for a while!  One of the things we learned at MTI was the importance of saying “good” Goodbyes because it puts one at peace and shows the value of the relationship with those one is leaving and also opens up the individual for the opportunity to say many new Hello’s!!

I had the privilege of being commissioned and sent out for service in Africa by both Christ Community Chapel, in Hudson and Grace Baptist Church, in Kent.  I feel very loved and blessed to have such strong bodies of Christ behind me as I step out in to the unknown of my future!!

After working like crazy to pack up everything going to Africa and eliminating those things that didn’t quite make the cut, I was ready to go!  Two large bags and one bin (see picture below) and that’s it for now!  I boarded the plane with my good friend Tom to visit the New College at the University of Edinburgh, in Scotland.  Tom will be studying there in the fall, and knowing I would have a layover somewhere near there, we planned to visit together!  It was been a wonderful time of rest and relaxation, and I have enjoyed seeing some of the sights of Scotland.

I am headed to London, England today (Feb 25) and will be heading from there to Lusaka, Zambia tomorrow.  Lord Willing I will arrive in Lusaka, Zambia at 6:55am local time on Wed. Feb. 27th!!!  (That is 11:55pm Tues. Feb. 26th EST.) Please be in prayer for safe travels and a smooth transition!  Not sure what the next few weeks will look like for me, but most likely I’ll be looking for a vehicle, learning where things are located in Lusaka, learning as much about the culture as I can, and possibly living in a village for a little while!

Until I can update again, check out these pictures from my final days in the United States, and my time in Scotland!!

Much Love,

Jonathan